Brittanicus Stone

“I am passionate about British stones and marbles. They are true marvels of nature and geology; luminescent, beautiful, rare and unique.” Orlando Boyne – Britannicus Stone

 

Britannicus Stone is the world’s leading provider of British stones and marbles. Sourcing only the very best carboniferous limestones from the depths of the beautiful British landscape, Britannicus has unrivalled expertise in the quarrying and presentation of a huge range of rare and unique stone pieces to adorn interior and exterior spaces.

The Ethical Stone Company has partnered with Britannicus Stone to gain exclusive access to over 25 polishing stones and marble in Britain. British rocks are the under-discovered gems of the stone market, each with its own particular characteristic – from the warmth of the fossil rich Yorkshire Swaledale to the brooding dark depths of Ashburton from Devon.

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Anglesey

Anglesey is a geologist’s dream with abundant stone including the renowned Anglesey Marble. This beautiful mid-grey marbled stone with fine calcite veins was used to build Birmingham Town Hall and the Menai Bridge.

There is now only one marble quarry left and Britannicus Stone has exclusivity to the remaining polishing bed. 3.5m lengths can be achieved.

Typical slab sizes are 2.6m x 1.4m; however they can vary.

Anglesey Vein

This beautiful marble is strictly in limited supply. Careful cutting and polishing of this rare material produces a grey marbled stone with fine calcite veins that can be ‘bookmatched’ to create visually stunning panel patterns. This stone is truly unique and rare.

Typical slab sizes are 2.3m x 1.0m; however they can vary.

Ashburton

Made famous by the Torquay marble polishers, this Devonian Marble features in many of the county’s local churches and grand houses. Used for both cladding and flooring, this marble can be found in the bathrooms of the London Hilton and the foyer of the Post Office Tower.

During the latter half of the 20th century the material was widely exported to South Africa, Hong Kong and the United States where, most notably, it was used in the President Roosevelt Memorial in Washington DC. This beautiful stone comprises of a dark grey background with swirls of coral fossil and white or pink calcite veins.

Typical slab sizes are 1.7m x 1.5m; however they can vary.

Ball Eye Blue

Ball Eye Blue is simply one of the rarest of all British stones; it is also extremely beautiful. Quarried in Derbyshire, Ball Eye Blue is a rare vein of Limestone/Fluorite conglomerate. The vein in the marble varies in colour from Amethyst on the outer edge of the deposit to Royal Blue towards the middle.

The density of Fluorite increases at the centre of the deposit intensifying the vivid blue colouration. There is currently only one single block of Ball Eye Blue available. It is the true jewel of Derbyshire.  Marble thickness are in 40mm, 30mm and 20mm.

Typical slab sizes are 3.1m x 1.7m; however they can vary.

Dumfries Red

Dumfries Red is another shining stone sourced in Scotland. But unlike Ledmore, this is a brecciated conglomerate rather than a true marble.

Being a conglomerate, it is made up of many crushed stones all held together by a natural cement. The Dumfries Red, when polished, has segments the colour of garnet, mixed with varying shades of red through to grey and blue.

As with many of Britannicus’s stones, the polishing beds have not been widely used before and so are new to the market.

Typical slab sizes are 2m x 1m; however they can vary.

Eskett Black / Vein

Traditionally, Eskett is an aggregate quarry supplying crushed stone for industrial applications and there is no history of this limestone being used in buildings. Britannicus Stone has secured access to the polishing beds that contain a variety of intriguing mottled coloured stones and, for the first time, the true beauty of what Eskett quarry has to offer is revealed.

From the light and dark greys of Eskett Light, the blood red of Eskett Red through to the rare Veined Black, these stones, when cut and polished, produce some of the most beautiful ‘marble’ in the British Isles.

Typical slab sizes are 2.0m x 1.0m ; however they can vary.

Eskett Leopard

Eskett Leopard is a hugely interesting and unusual stone with its white veins threading their way through the brown mottles and silvery incursions, whilst others crisscross across the face of the stone. This is a very distinctive ‘marble’ and its rarity is exemplified in its popularity.

Typical slab sizes are 2.1m x 1.4m; however they can vary.

Eskett Light

Britannicus Stone is the first to showcase this luxurious and beautiful stone. Honed or highly polished this mottled light and dark grey coloured stone is a treasured addition to the Britannicus stable.

Typical slab sizes are 2m x 0.80m: however they can vary.

Eskett Red

Eskett Red is a hugely interesting and unusual stone with its white veins threading their way through the brown mottles and silvery incursions, whilst others crisscross across the face of the stone. This is a very distinctive ‘marble’ and its rarity is exemplified in its popularity.

Typical slab sizes are 2.1m x 1.4m; however they can vary.

Frosterley

Britannicus Stone offers a British marble that is quarried from the banks of the River Wear in Durham.

The dark grey to black marble known as Frosterley marble is another British stone that comes to life when polished. It has white fossils running throughout produced from a tropical seabed some 325 million years ago.

This marble has been quarried from the valleys around Frosterley since the 12th century and in the earlier years was used in a variety of northern England decorative pieces on high status buildings such as Bishop Pudsey’s Great Hall, Bishop Auckland Castle and, most famously, Durham Cathedral.

Typical slab sizes are 1.5m x 1.2m; however they can vary.

Green Serpentine

This attractive stone was created millions of years ago when peridotite, a rock rich in iron and magnesium, was thrust upwards from beneath the earth’s crust. The stone is a result of serpentinisation, a form of metamorphism involving heated seawater far below the ocean.

Used by George Bullock for his furniture, the Serpentine’s is hugely decorative and rare. The stone has often been used for console tables and object d’art.

Typical slab sizes are 1m x 0.5m; however they can vary.

Hopton Wood

The renowned Derbyshire stone, Hopton Wood, has been used extensively on the floors of Chatsworth House, aka ‘The Palace of the Peak District’ (17th century) and The Houses of Parliament. It was laid in conjunction with a native black stone (which is no longer available) to create the first chequerboard floor in England.

Hopton Wood limestone is light beige/white in colour, with its unique and beautiful characteristics brought to life when polished.

Typical limestone slab sizes are 1.4m x 1.0m; however they can vary.

Ledmore

This stunningly beautiful British stone is the only true marble on mainland Britain and is consequently treasured across the globe. Ledmore usually consists of large white veins resulting from calcium compounds, lime green veining originating from copper compounds, and greys and blacks from organic compounds; in short a facsimile of British geological history.

With the initial deposits laid down 600 million years ago, the veining is relatively young at 430 million years.

Typical slab sizes are 2m x 1m; however they can vary.

Ledmore Grey

This impressive stone from the Ledmore Quarry in Sutherland is the only marble quarry on mainland Britain, the other is on the Isle of Skye. The Ledmore Grey marble contains large white veins made up of calcium compounds, black veining originating from organic compounds and brown veining from copper compounds.

With the initial deposits laid down 600 million years ago, the veining is comparatively young at 430 million years. The creation of this stone occurred when syenite igneous rock thrust its way up through the Durness Limestone deposits creating Serpentine and Brucite, the colours of which are brought to life with polishing.

Typical slab sizes are 2.1m x 1.5m; however they can vary.

Mendip

Britannicus is the first ever to use Mendip as an interior features stone.

The grey and brown marble is adorned with pink and blue hues, which are more prominent as you reach the middle of the block. It was one such example that lead a leading interior designer to remark that the colouration resembled ‘the birth of a new galaxy’. Coloration varies from block to block.

Typical slab sizes are 1.2m x 1.0m: however they can vary.

Moorcroft Cartoon

Moorcroft Cartoon is one of Britannicus’ most extraordinary stones because of its interesting and nonfigurative patterns.

Sourced in Plymouth the stone has significant variations produced by mineral clustering and colouration. The slabs have a wonderful combination of daubed blues and greys with contrasting orange and red veins.

Typical slabs are1.6m x 1m.

Moorcroft Grey

Moorcroft Grey had never been cut or polished to create a marble until Britannicus did so. Quarried in Plymouth this gentle grey stone is naturally infused with gold, pink and white mineralization, and has been compared by one Italian marble expert as the British answer to a grey ‘Portoro’. There will be natural colour variations from block to block.  Typical slab sizes are 1.9m x 1.2m;

Moorcroft Vein

Moorcroft Vein is quarried from the same location in Plymouth as Moorcroft Grey, and features flashes of white calcite veining and pink swirls on a grey background. This combination creates truly unique and dramatic marble patterns and colouration.

Vein matching – polishing opposite faces of stone – is guaranteed to produce striking results.

Typical slab sizes are 1.7m x 0.9m; however they can vary.

Red Serpentine

This remarkable stone was created millions of years ago when peridotite, a rock rich in magnesium and iron, was driven upwards from beneath the earth’s crust.

Red Serpentine is a beautiful multi-veined stone and, due to its rarity and highly decorative nature, was often used by George Bullock for a number of pieces of luxury furniture.
Typical slab size are 1m x 0.5m; however they can vary.

Saltwerwath

Salterwath is one of Britain’s ancient building stones. Britannicus has taken this highly respected stone and polished it to create an eye-catching example of stone.

The polished stone results in a rich, chocolate brown shade with light and dark brown swirls, punctuated by some fine white calcite lines and the occasional small pink/white calcite rose.

Typical slab sizes are 3.0m x 1.2m; however they can vary.

Stanhope Famp

Stanhope Famp is a limestone that caps outcrops of stone throughout the Weardale Valley, in County Durham. It is a simple black stone that is unlike any other and its simplicity makes it a wonderful foil for more established marbles.

The stone is well suited for sculpting and over time has produced a number of beautiful pieces.

Typical slab sizes are 1.5x 1.2m; however they can vary.

Stoneycombe

Stoneycombe is a mixture of soft pinks and light reds with hints of grey and intricately shaped crustaceans and corals for added depth. Small cream coloured calcite veins make sure that this stone is always interesting. It is a Devonian Limestone, found in the same areas as two other Britannicus stones, Ashburton and Moorcroft.

Typical marble slabs are 1.4m x 1.0m; however they can vary.

Swaledale Fossil

This Crinoidal limestone is a true rock of ages – over 350 million years old. Its story dramatically reflected by the stunning and large fossils that emerge as a result of the polishing process. It was quarried in North Yorkshire and used in Durham Cathedral (13th century) and as pavements for York Minster (15th century).

It then went out of vogue, perhaps due to it being very dense and difficult to work, but it reappeared in the 18th and 19th century in some houses of distinction in the north of England.

Typical slab sizes are 2m x 1m: however they can vary.

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